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Tulips


TulipsTulips are showy spring flowers. Drainage may be considered as the chief means of success in the cultivation of the tulip. The soil they like best is well-rotted turf cut from pasture land and mixed with a moderate amount of sand, but they will thrive in any ground that is well drained.

The tulip bulbs should be planted during October and November about three inches deep and five inches apart, either in lines or groups, and they retain their bloom longest in a shady situation. As soon as the leaves begin to decay the bulbs may be taken up, dried, and stored away, keeping the colours separate.

For pot-culture the single varieties are best. Put 3 tulip bulbs in a five-inch pot and 6 in a six-inch one, and treat in the same manner as the Hyacinth. They may, if desired, be forced as soon as the shoots appear.

When required to fill vases, etc., it is a good plan to grow them in shallow boxes, and transfer them when in flower to the vases or baskets. By this method exactitude of height and colouring is ensured.

Tulips are divided into three classes:
  1. Roses, which have a white ground, with crimson, pink, or scarlet marks;
  2. Byblomens, having also a white ground, but with lilac, purple, or black marks
  3. Bizarres, with a yellow ground having marks of any colour